Author Archives: Josh Lepawsky

Mapping USA electronics manufacturing pollution

The US ‘tech sector’ has been a major source of toxicant releases. These interactive maps show the chemical legacy of electronic manufacturing in the US.

Reorganized Organ: youth mentorship project

Are you an artist, musician, hacker, tinkerer, or generally a curious person, between 18 and 24 years?

Repair-scapes

How might thinking through repair in terms of space change how we think about – and practice – repair? In what follows, we describe four cases from our research projects that highlight the spatialities of repair.

Precision is not accuracy.

We often use the words precision and accuracy interchangeably in everyday conversation, but in statistics they mean different things.

Article Alert! Redefining pollution and action: The matter of plastics

From the specific case of marine plastics, Liboiron’s paper offers a more general point that those of us who study discards need to remember to take seriously: How we represent the materiality of the discards we study has a crucial influence on the effectiveness of any action proposed to solve or mitigate their generation.

Trading on distortion

The lead researcher on a seminal work mapping the international traffic of e-waste responds to criticism of his research on material flows.

Bigger, Better, Faster, More? Breaking the taboo of production

“When recycling is framed as the solution to waste problems, as it so often is in the case of e-waste, both the problem and the solution are mismatched. Recycling post-consumer commodities will do nothing to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions (or any other wastes) arising during manufacturing, long before we purchase that which we will later throwaway or recycle.” Instead, we need to look at slowing production if we want to make an impact on electronic waste.

Sizing Up ‘Slow Violence’

If a key challenge of slow violence is how to adequately represent it so that it may be investigated, opposed, and redressed why represent its power as more formidable than it already is? There is poetry in the law, but legal personhood for corporations is not magic. It’s infrastructure.