Ethnographic Refusal: A How to Guide


Bibliography on Action-Based Research Methods

This image of a pregnant Inuk woman was taken during a four month long dump fire that occurred in the Arctic community of Iqaluit, Nunavut. During the fire, pregnant women and women of childbearing age were warned not to go outside due to risks of dioxin contamination. The Inuktitut syllabics written on her hand read ‘Taima’ or ‘enough’, referring to decades of government underfunding that contributed to this and many other dump fires. The image is an example of refusal, as the image refuses to depict Inuit as passive victims of slow violence, instead redirecting attention towards government institutions. The image was distributed to media outlets and became the Facebook profile photo of a local ‘Stop the Dump Fires’ protest group. Photo by Shawn Inuksuk, 2014.

Refusal as Research Method in Discard Studies


Dumpster Diving at the World’s Largest Particle Accelerator


Municipal versus Industrial Waste: Questioning the 3-97 ratio


How to do a household waste audit–and why

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Trading on distortion

The Ice Cream Scoop is designed to be trawled behind people while they are in the water.

Building DIY citizen science technology to see invisible marine plastics

The dog owned by the McFeelys at the time of the author’s visit to the site of Nancy’s seizure. Hastings, Nebraska, April 2011. Photo by Nicholas Shapiro.

Article Alert! Attuning to the Chemosphere: Domestic Formaldehyde, Bodily Reasoning, and the Chemical Sublime

Concept of one Dettah Yourth: keep the site ugly so everyone knows something bad has happened here.

Designing for the Future at Giant Mine