Category Archives: Waste

PSA: Beware of Easy Narratives

This is a Twitter essay by Josh Lepawsky (@rubbishmaker) about one of many recent examples of reporting on the e-waste trade. Many of the problems specific to the article considered here can be found in a wide variety of reportage about the international waste trade more generally.

The Tragedy of the Tragedy of the commons

A Twitter essay by Matto Mildenberger (@mmildenberger)   Something I’ve been meaning to say about The Tragedy of the Commons. Bear with me for a small thread on why our embrace of Hardin is a stain on environmentalism: we’ve let a flawed metaphor by a racist ecologist define environmental thinking for a half century. Hardin’s […]
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Rethinking Remediation

Mining is, as some in the industry quip, primarily a waste management industry.

Yes, Genocide (a primer on the term) #MMIWG

For Raphael Lemkin, who invented the term, genocide was the effort to destroy a group as a group. #MMIWG

Queering chemicals (EDCs): A bibliography

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) are a class of environmental toxicants that may impact sex, gender, and sexuality. Here is our bibliography on queering EDCs.

Mapping USA electronics manufacturing pollution

The US ‘tech sector’ has been a major source of toxicant releases. These interactive maps show the chemical legacy of electronic manufacturing in the US.

When your research is attacked

Attacks on research have become routinized and institutionalized. Here is our step-by-step guide on what to do if you and your research are attacked.

Top Discard Studies articles in 2018

What are the most frequently read articles on Discard Studies? You might be surprised by #1!

The what and the why of Discard Studies

We tend to think that we are familiar with waste because we deal with it every day. Yet, this is not the case–most aspects of waste are entirely hidden from view and understanding.

Discard Studies going dark, being reborn in mid-2018

Dear Discard Studies Readers, I have been posting on this blog every week for the past seven years. It has been a pleasure. I began as a PhD student under Robin Nagle, who founded this blog in 2010, and am now in my third year as an assistant professor. The blog began with a model […]
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